Tekken Tag Tournament 2/Jaguar Multithrow Tree

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Tekken Tag Tournament 2: The Jaguars Guide

Quick Resources: Jaguar Punishers, Jaguar Combos, Howling's Oki List, King Frame Data, Armor King Frame Data

Movelist Breakdowns: King's Movelist Breakdown, Armor King's Movelist Breakdown, King's Wavedash, Step-By-Step

Throws Guides: The Art of Buffering, Jaguar Throw Buffering, Jaguar Multithrow Tree

Gameplay Guides: Jaguar Wavedash Options, Jaguar Standing Options, Jaguar Oki Options, Tips Strategies and Mindsets

Contents

Multi Throws... Sometimes it is the sole reason why we picked up the Jaguars. There's nothing more cool than pummeling someone on the ground while your opponent is like "WHAAA...". But as much as it is fun, multi throws gets a lot of bad rep for two things. First, it is used by many scrubs as their go-to attacks... kinda like gimmicky crutches. Many got wins just because of this, but when fundamentally sound players space properly, scrubs suddenly got no other tools left to use with. Second is, there are many complicated inputs and branches multi throws have when you look at them in the movelist, and many King players just neglect them altogether because they are intimidated to learn them, and King being solid enough even without throws altogether doesn't give them incentives to practice multi throws.

This two views are the reasons why multi throws are usually put in the back burner when trying to learn King and Armor King in a more competitive setting, but at the same time, people miss out on an totally awesome threat of multi throws, not just as flashy moves to frustrate opponents and cheer up the audience, but also a practical tool and viable offensive threat.

Objectives

The goal of this guide is to:

1. Show the practicality of multi throws in a competitive setting

2. Help assisting to learn the multi throw branches.

3. Show the situations where each multi throw shine.

Why use Multithrows?

Aside from being flashy and cool and awesome and manly and... (wait I gotta stop)...

Well, aside from that, there are many practical reasons why you would want to use multi throws...

1. They give you pretty great damage output potential for so little risks. This is what is pretty scary about multi throws. People would argue most of the time that multi throws tend to get broken. Well, look... even if they are broken, what does the opponent get? Aside from Standing Achilles Hold that does measly, almost ignorable damage, YOUR OPPONENT GETS NOTHING. They just get away with more torture. This is what people tend to forget. Multithrows and throws in general are damaging for their too little risks, and the only real way to punish a thrower is to actually anticipate and duck, and when that comes, it's pretty much the opponent admitting "I can't deal with your throws and I'm willing to play with fire".

2. When you do multi throws, you control what is happening in the game. Yes, you are in the driver seat when you do multi throws. Look, you decide which break among 2 or even 3 throw extensions and your opponent has to guess, and as we mentioned before, even if he guess right, he isn't rewarded, he just merely escapes. Not only that, but you control the clock and control the pace of the game, as multi throws eat precious time if you decide to continue or you can go for oki setups. pretty much set the tone basically.

3. Your opponents cannot do anything until they actually break the string. When you caught someone in a multi throw, your opponents are forced to play the guessing game. What this means is they can't use their precious movement to option-select all you attacks, or use their oh-so-precious execution and knowledge (Yes, they can't EWGF while the Jaguars are breaking their bones). Opponents can also throw away the health management since they can't even tag out at all. This aspect is massive, as you basically confine your opponents into this small box where they can't do much. This can cause frustration to your opponents and can throw their rhythm off when playing. By then, you are already in their heads.

As you can see, multi throws are pretty good as leverage tools. It pretty much put you in favorable ground every single time you caught your opponent through it. But for it to work this way you need to be able to work stuff on your mind. Some of which is...

1. Being observant. Your goal is to always be wary of the situation and your opponent. There are times where you cannot squeak in the multi throws and there will be times that your opponent shouts "HEY GRAB ME!". You need to be able to recognize those times. And not only that, you need to look at your opponent and be able to have an educated guess on how he will approach the multi throw. You should be observant of how he tries to break your multi throws after each time you attempted to grab him. By a couple of times, you should know if he's mashing a certain break, having limited knowledge, or just preferring to break a certain chain.

2. Being alert cause well... theory is nothing if we can't do it in the game. Multithrows got something against it that its at times complicated inputs can hinder you in game if you are just beginning to use it. You need to be able to do them in pressure situations fast when the opportunity presents itself, and that requires practice.

3. Having Self Control. Because the real hurdle of multi throws is not the opponent being knowledgable against it. In fact, I can say confidently that the more your opponent knows about multi throws, the more multi throws become effective. The real problem is that most of the time, we as the Jaguar players tend to be totally greedy and always go for the max damage chain (RDC comes to mind). Remember, the goal of the multi throws is to not inflict the max damage every time, it's to take control of the pace of the game. You want to establish multi throws as real offensive threats that you could use for even longer sets (where gimmicks tend to die). I'm not saying you can't use RDC, but be sure to not forget the Dragon Sleeper!

Things we need

For multi throws to be really effective in-game wise, you need to be able to:

1. Be proficient in your crouch/wavedash. First of all, most of the multi throw starters come from crouch dashes, and you can pretty much forget to use multi throws if you don't use your crouch dash arsenal in the first place.

2. Be aware of your chains and their breaks. Knowing your multi throws by heart will give you great edge a lot of times, not only that it lessens the risk of missing inputs, but also letting you be able to pick the appropriate chain on the fly, depending on how your hypothesis about your opponent is...

As practice, I would recommend each one to at least learn to incorporate crouch dashes in their arsenal and learn each options first, assuming the people studying this is already solid fundamentally (meaning they got their movement, punishers, poking and other things on track). But personally, I would practice how to learn how to wavedash. Starting with AK regular wavedash then when you are comfortable, go practice King's wavedash. Then, practice trying to do all crouch dash attacks and multi throw chains at will. Then go to Arcade Mode/Ghost Battle and just try to do them at battle phase. Then try it against your competitive friends. Be sure that you do this gradually and initially expect mistakes.

NOTICE: Yes, this is an advanced tutorial (it assumes that you are solid enough fundamentally), and if you are willing to step up your game in this point, I would prefer you to buy an arcade stick and lagless monitor, as they really help. I would teach this course with arcade sticks in mind. As I am a firm believer of training in a way that I can play my best in every setting, including arcade cabs. This is why I totally discourage button binding, as it totally limits players especially when they have a chance to play in a place where there is a glorious arcade scene. Don't worry, this tutorial has command buffering in mind, those things will make you forget about button binding.

Command Buffering Notes

As I mentioned in The Art of Buffering, Command Buffering is the way you input the next upcoming command by by holding one part of it beforehand. This kind of buffering is EXTREMELY IMPORTANT in multithrows, cause not only it increases the percentage of you putting the right input, it also makes it way darn easier to do them. Needless to say, it simplifies many (not all) King's seemingly complicated inputs into something that can be easily done for the fly, and this guide's notation will try to show these easier commands. For these reason, we need to get familiar with some special notation for this guide.

  • [_] means hold whatever input inside
  • ~ means do the followup continuously
  • , (comma) would mean release all the inputs being hold

Unless a chain requires a honest unbuffered input, all of the commands in this guide is on buffered notation for simplicity, so if you want to look for the real notation and find better buffered notations, it doesn't hurt to look at your command list. Take note too that these notations are in a perspective of a stick player and pad players who play claw-style. Seriously, stop button binding! It can't get any easier than this!

Regular Crouchdash Multithrows

Regular Crouchdash Multithrows should work as one of your regular threats in a Jaguar's offense, cause unlike other multithrows, the throw starters is canned in crouchdash, so it's easily accessible and doesn't require any kind of setups to be useable. Also, because they are relatively shorter in duration (compared to other multithrows), they work well in the early stages of a round where you don't want to commit for an unsafe move, or if you want a relatively quick and safe damaging option mid match when you are trying to catch up. As long as you use them as one of your tools alongside the other crouchdash and wavedash options, incorporating these multithrows in your game shouldn't be much of a hassle. It's just up to us to stop being greedy.

Original Mexican Magma Drive Tree (King and Armor King)

Cobra Clutch

King JGS 1+4 or JGS 2+3 

Armor King cd+1+4 or cd+2+3 

1 or 2 Break

20 Damage
20 Total

Funeral Suplex 

2+4, 1+2, 1+2

1 Break

25 Damage
45 Total

Sleeper Hold

3+4, 3+4, 1+2

2 Break

15 Damage
35 Total

Sleeper Takedown (AK only)

2, [1]~[2]

1+2 Break

18 Damage
38 Total

Triple Trouble 

1, [1]~[2]

1 Break

20 Damage
55 Total

Human Necktie 

3, 4, 1+2, 3+4

2 Break

23 Damage
58 Total

Choke Sleeper (AK only)

4, [3]~4, 1+2

1 Break

22 Damage
60 Total

3 Count Pound (AK only)

3+4, 2, 1, [1]~[2]

2 Break

 25 Damage
63 Total

First of all, please forget that King has these followups for Jaguar Step (You'll see why later below). This is primarily Armor King's multithrow chain. Unlike King, Armor King's multithrows isn't as damaging and it doesn't drag out as long (so you cannot really use this as a pace-controller), but compared to King's crouchdash multithrows, it comes out faster and its easier to use because both cd+1+4 and cd+2+3 lead to the same multichain. This also makes the break a total guess unlike King's (where King having different throw animation out of cd multithrows gives the opponent a really tight throwbreak window. Yes it's still super hard to break, but the window is there).

Another one of the more common use of this multithrow chain is oki. Aside from Tombstone and Steiner Screwdriver (both are noticeable 2 break throws), most of AK's standing throws give bad oki. This is where this multithrows shine. Both the Sleeper Hold and Sleeper Takedown give favorable oki situation if you decide to not do the next chain, so keep this in mind.

Arm Breaker Tree (King)

Arm Breaker

cd+1+4

1 Break

20 Damage
20 Total

Triple Arm Breaker

1+2, 1+2

1 Break

30 Damage
50 Total

Russian Leg Sweep

1+2, [4]~[2]

2 Break

20 Damage
40 Total

Chicken Wing Face Lock

[2]~[1]~[3] 

1+2 Break

20 Damage
20 Total

Arm Crucifixion

4, 3, 4, 3+4, 1+2 

No Break

25 Damage
65 Total

Dragon Sleeper

2, 1, 3, 1+2+4, 1+2+4 

1 Break

30 Damage
70 Total

Rolling Death Cradle

1+3, 3+4, 2+4, [1+2]~[3] 

2 Break

70 Damage
110 Total

This chain pretty much make people wanna pick up King. Despite the cd 2+3 being superior chain considering the damage potential you can get with with fewer guesses, the threat of Rolling Death Cradle is still there, and it hurts. But honestly, Rolling Death Cradle really isn't something people should always do. Rolling Death Cradle acts more like a decoy to prevent people from trying to break other chains. Russian Leg Sweep extension for example, do really nice 65 damage and nice oki (gives a free ali kick but with strict timing), and Dragon Sleeper extension does decent damage too and great wakes (also gives you free ali kick on strict window). So yeah, stop being greedy.

Standing Achilles Hold Tree (King)

Standing Achilles Hold

cd+2+3 

2 Break

25 Damage
25 Total

S.T.F.

1, 2, 3, 1+2

1 Break

35 Damage
60 Total

Scorpion Death Lock

1+2, 4, [3]~[4]

2 Break

40 Damage
65 Total

Indian Death Lock

1+2, [1]~[3]~[2]

1+2 Break

25 Damage
50 Total

Romero Special

1, 3, 4, 1+2, 3+4

No Break

45 Damage
95 Total

This chain is so good that it shames Marduk's mount. This is only a 2 guess chain and all 3 followups should be respected because they hurt. The S.T.F and Sharpshooter (Scorpion Death Lock) give nice damage plus sick wakes and the Indian Death Lock is the most awesome extension damage wise for a one-guess chain (Indian Death Lock plus Romero Special does the same damage as RDC, and when you do the math, it's more probable to land this over RDC if you use the other chains too). The only downside of this chain is when people actually guessed right, you get jab damage, but that is measly compared to the rewards you can get and the probability of your opponent breaking the followup chains.

Mastering Crouchdash Multis

Practicing Notes

First of all, try to learn all of the possible chains in practice mode until you are comfortable doing them in fight time. For Armor King, you got 5 chains coming off 2 different cd input, and for King, you got 7 chains to practice. The toughest part for AK is landing his 3-Count Pound (3+4, 2, 1, [1]~2). It's a hard throw to learn initially because of the combination of large input and short input window (Sleeper Takedown is really quick). But it's learnable. For King however, personally, I have struggles at first learning the Arm Crucifixion chain and Rolling Death Cradle. For Arm Crucifixion (4,3,4,3+4,1+2), it seemed to be an easy input (and it really is), but it can be tricky because it requires a honest input, meaning no buffering between 4 and 3+4. Once you get out of that hurdle, it should be ok.

Rolling Death Cradle also require a honest input on the first 3 parts. This is why people tend to button bind (and it's understandable for pad players, because the buttons are too small and hard to press altogether). That honestly made my move to stick playing, and I never went back lol. I find using my index finger for 1+3, index and middle finger's tip at 3+4, and middle finger for 2+4 to be the most convenient and more accurate and faster way of inputting it. It's good to have sanwa buttons lol.

Wavedash

One of the things that makes cd multithrows great is because of their accessibility. Coming out from crouchdash means you can use it as a offensive close in tool along with other crouchdash moves. Also, when you learn how to wavedash with both King and Armor King, you can use your multithrows any time you think its necessary. When partnered with wavedash, multithrows beef up Jaguars' offense alot. But the key word here is if you can wavedash...

As we all know, both King and Armor King got two different wavedashes, and some won't even bother learning how to do King's wavedash, depriving themselves on a really awesome offensive tool for King. But even when learning it, there's this other things you have to struggle, one of them I called input confusion. Because the input of both chars are eerie similar yet different, your muscle memory might be in total confusion in battle, which either in clutch situations, you get to do King's wavedash with AK and do AK's wavedash with King, and both don't work. Even just changing the point character will lead you to this confusion, and it's frustrating when this happens. The key for this is to practice both King and AK wavedash at the same time, and also changing your point character many times too. Not only you get familiar with doing wavedashes for both chars, but you also expose yourself on whatever weakness you have for a character. (Putting you character as an anchor tend to hide some of your weakness using that character because they usually come in with either a life lead and rage).

Second problem is we tend to overuse whatever shiny new toy we have even when it isn't the right time for it. This applies for multithrows alot. Let's remember to use them (along with wavedash) with great caution. The goal is to incorporate them into your gameplay, not make them your crutches. Train and play accordingly.

Pseudo-Crouchdash Multithrows

I have a love-hate relationship with this type of multithrow chain. These throwchains strike the balance of the amount of guessing chances for your opponent, the amount of time you chew out, and the high damage potential. HOWEVER, the multithrow starter is the most risky to do. Both have a canned crouchdash that you cannot cancel out, putting you on risk of being hopkicked or ducked punished. I seriously wish to Namco that at least they add the ability to cancel the throw so we can do FC/WS moves to at least protect the multithrow starters, but for now, you have to be either pretty ballsy using it on the standing game, or set it up on wakeups and some wall situations and use it like unblockables, where it has the least chance of getting punished.

Reverse Special Stretch Bomb Tree (King)

Reverse Special Stretch Bomb

df+1+2

1+2 Break

25 Damage
25 Total

Cannonball Buster

2, [2]~1

No Break

15 Damage
40 Total

Powerbomb

1, 2, 3+4

1 Break

22 Damage
 62 Total

Manhattan Drop

3+4, [1+2]~4

2 Break

15 Damage
55 Total

Victory Bomb

1, 2, 3+4, 1+2

No Break

18 Damage
73 Total

Giant Swing

2, 1, 3, 4

1 Break

25 Damage
87 Total

Muscle Buster

3, 1, 2, [3+4]~[1+2]

2 Break

30 Damage
92 Total

Giant Swing

2, 1, 3, 4

1 Break

25 Damage
98 Total

Muscle Buster

3, 1, 2, [3+4]~[1+2]

2 Break

30 Damage
103 Total

This multithrow starter can be annoying at times because it tends to come out when we do a missed input on cd 1+2, and it can be pretty annoying at times. But in fairness, this isn't bad of a multithrow starter. It gives you a guaranteed 40 damage (Shining Wizard Damage) plus followups. But as I said before, this can be risky because the canned crouchdash sometimes gives it away. And by this point, everyone should know that the starter is a 1+2 break, so if you want to actually use this to your game, you have to mix it up with the Reverse Arm Slam starter.

Reverse Arm Slam Tree (King)

Reverse Arm Slam

f~df+1+3 or f~df+2+4

1 or 2 Break

22 Damage
22 Total

Backdrop Suplex

2, [1]~[2]

1 or 2 Break

15 Damage
37 Total

German Suplex

3+4, 1+2

1 Break

15 Damage
52 Total

Cannonball Buster

2, [2]~[1]

2 Break

15 Damage
52 Total

Powerbomb

1, 2, 3+4

No Break

22 Damage
74 Total

Powerbomb

1, 2, 3+4

1 Break

22 Damage
74 Total

Manhattan Drop

3+4, [1+2]~[4]

2 Break

15 Damage
67 Total

Victory Bomb

1, 2, 3+4, 1+2 

No Break

18 Damage
85 Total

Giant Swing

2, 1, 3, 4

1 Break

25 Damage
99 Total

Muscle Buster

3, 1, 2, [3+4]~[1+2]

2 Break

30 Damage
104 Total

Giant Swing

2, 1, 3, 4

1 Break

25 Damage
99 Total

Muscle Buster

3, 1, 2, [3+4]~[1+2]

2 Break

30 Damage
104 Total

Giant Swing

2, 1, 3, 4

1 Break

25 Damage
104 Total

Muscle Buster

3, 1, 2, [3+4]~[1+2]

2 Break

30 Damage
115 Total

Reverse Arm Slam Multithrows have this weird thing going on with it, where the second chain isn't really a guaranteed, but copies the throwbreak of the starter. This gives the opponent bigger throwbreak window (since the Reverse Arm Slam is pretty fast animation wise), or it can even be option selected IF your opponent knows that it's the Reverse Arm Slam coming. That's a big if. When used with df+1+2, this iffy throwbreak window goes away, as they are guessing between a 1~2_2~1 break or a 1+2 break. This multithrows can be handy and honestly, they're easy to learn, so it's now gonna bother you too much to memorize them.

Mastering Pseudo-Crouchdash Multis

The tricky part of this multithrow starters is the canned wavedash. Those things make the move a slow and linear option that will put you into a world of hurt if you do not know what you are doing. When you decide to incorporate this in your game and go TTT1 on people, your goal is to hide this crouchdash as much as possible and not put opponents in a position of moving around or ducking to actually punish my attempt. Here are some of the situations you can use to do this.

Okizeme

One of the most useful situations this multithrow shines is okizeme. The small crouchdash covers reasonable ground, giving the starters some range, and that can be handy with backrollers. You can treat these moves as unblockable tech traps (like King F+1+2 and AK cd 3). At this point in the game, nobody will duck this and instead try out their throwbreaking, which is something we can deal with. I would be more scared if this chain starter actually gets ducked or sidestepped because of whiff punishment.

Another note too. All of the multithrow chains either stay put on one position, or do an exact 180 degrees of switching position. This is a great thing as you can decide whether to finish the multithrow chain or not by looking at the walls. Some of the oki for some of the chains are favorable, and because of the 180 degree nature of this, you can use it perfect near the walls and do the followups that will put your opponent between you and the wall.

Wavedash

Another way to hide the canned crouchdash is of course, hide it with a bunch of crouchdashes! Wavedashes are super effective way to hide the canned crouchdashes in the standing game, as honestly, the regular crouchdash and the canned crouchdash can be hard to distinguish (if you can distinguish them at all, just beware though that some DO distinguish them). The best thing to use is the df+1+2 starter, because of its simplicity of input (you can just do df+1+2 on the forward dash part of the wavedash), and its also a 1+2 break, which complements the other crouchdash multithrows. However, even if you can hide it, it still doesn't stop the fact that you are still vulnerable, and wavedashing will not help if your opponent just loves yolo hopkicks.

Just take a note though, even if I won't recommend it, you can still do f~df+1+3_2+4 starter on wavedash if you prefer it over the regular crouchdash multithrows, but it's not gonna work on the forward dash part. You have to cancel the forward dash into instant while running state (add another f between the crouchdashes to achieve this). Technically, you cannot do this multithrow starter after a forward dash, so even a regular dash reverse arm slam won't work. Another note I would like to say is, be sure to be sharp on your inputs when incorporating df+1+2 as a wavedash option. It is a big grief on some King players when they wanted to do cd+1+2 but df+1+2 instead, and when it actually hits, they do not know the followups. I hope this will be different for you, so practice doing df+1+2 and cd+1+2 and know the motion difference, and not only that, know when to use both, not throwing the other tools away.

Jaguar Step Multithrow

Unlike the previous multithrows, this multithrow for King has alot of guess chances for your opponent (about 5 guess chances max), but with that, it is the most complicated multithrow to break for your opponent, and because the chain is so big, you can use this to actually control the pace of the game. This can be a great tool even after just one juggle, because when you actually get the starter, THEY HAVE TO PLAY YOUR GAME. They are pretty much trapped till they escape, and the damage is usually enough to even garner a K.O. after a solo King juggle, or in a lamer way, a time over with life lead on your side, so if you know how the multithrow branches, you can leave your opponents into a salty place. This, along with Jaguar Step, is something King players should continue exploring and incorporating in their game, because it's that good.

Mexican Magma Drive II Tree (King)

Cobra Clutch

JGS 1+4 or JGS 2+3

1 or 2 Break

20 Damage
20 Total

Abdominal Stretch

1, 4, 2, 3 

No Break

12 Damage
32 Total

Reverse DDT

[2]~[1]~3 or [2]~[1]~4

1 or 2 Break

13 Damage
45 Total

Reverse Special Stretch Bomb

1+2, [1]~[2]~[3] or 1+2, [1]~[2]~[4]

1 or 2 Break

16 Damage
61 Total

Samurai Lock

2, 3, [1]~[2] 

1+2 Break

24 Damage
69 Total

Cannonball Buster

2, [2]~[1]

No Break

13 Damage
74 Total

Backdrop Suplex

3+4, 1+2

No Break

15 Damage
76 Total

Powerbomb

1, 2, 3+4

1 Break

16 Damage
94 Total

Manhattan Drop

3+4, [1+2]~[4]

2 Break

12 Damage
86 Total

Burning Hammer

1+2, [3]~[4]~[1] or 1+2, [3]~[4]~[2]

1 or 2 Break

18 Damage
94 Total

Sol Naciente

1+2, 4, [1+2]~[3]

1+2 Break

27 Damage
103 Total

Victory Bomb

1, 2, 3+4, 1+2

No Break

15 Damage
101 Total

Giant Swing

2, 1, 3, 4

1 Break

20 Damage
114 Total

Muscle Buster

3, 1, 2, [3+4]~[1+2] 

2 Break

25 Damage
119 Total

Giant Swing

2, 1, 3, 4

1 Break

20 Damage
121 Total

Muscle Buster

3, 1, 2, [3+4]~[1+2] 

2 Break

25 Damage
126 Total

Screwdriver

[2+4]~[3]~1, [1+2]~[3] or [2+4]~[3]~1, [1+2]~[4]

1 or 2 Break

32 Damage
126 Total

I admit, this looks complicated, but honestly, it's an easy multithrow to learn because the buffering makes the input easier. But even with that, I just want to make a couple of notes. I will break these chain into 3 parts, the initial chain, the cannonball chain and the backdrop chain.

Before I fully go on, let's compare this chain over Mexican Magma Drive 1 (AK's multithrow that King had). With our current chain,take note that the Abdominal Stretch is free after the Cobra Clutch (totaling of 32 damage) and the Reverse DDT have either 1 or 2 break which can total to 45 damage on either, not to mention you can still do followups after on both breaks. This makes the Mexican Magma Drive 1 for King totally obsolete. The starter of Mexican Magma Drive 1 does 25 damage, and the followups have either a 45 damage chain without followups (Funeral Suplex), or A weaker damage throw plus followups (Sleeper Hold), not to mention the the third followup is where the whole thing ends. So yeah, for King, DO NOT USE MEXICAN MAGMA DRIVE 1.

Anyway, back on the course. The initial chain comprised of the cobra clutch up until Reverse Special Stretch Bomb/Samurai Lock. From there, your opponent has 3 chances of escaping (including the multithrow starter). The magic of this multithrow chain is all the 1 or 2 break chain is exactly the same, which puts us in a kinda weird position compared to other previous multithrows. The ordinary multithrows King has usually have range from a weaker one to a stronger one (breaks usually go from 1 break as the weakest, 2 is a stronger one and 1+2 as the strongest followup if the chain has that followup). Though some might find it bad, in reality, it gives King players a way to predict which chain their opponents are most likely to break. This isn't the case here. Because the chains are equal in damage, the opponent is forced to actually mash one specific break until they noticed that you are doing one kind of break the whole time. This is, most of the time, the theme of Jaguar Step Multithrows, and is a dynamic King players have to manipulate to their advantage. As a King player, you have to know what break they tend to mash with, and if they tend to change the breaks they tend to mash many times. Usually, if they tend to mash a break and you figure out which break is it, it's a free 126 damage to you. It's more of a pain when they tend to change breaks but you have 1+2 break chains for that.

After the Reverse Special Stretch Bomb, you have two choices. Either go to the Cannonball Chain or go to Backdrop Chain. Both have advantages and disadvantages. The Cannonball Chain is simply the df+1+2 chain with damage nerfed to fit the 126 damage limit. Overall, it is a weaker chain damage wise (not every chain reach max damage) and you only have a 1 or 2 break (making it a 50/50 guess technically), but it is composed of a weaker and a stronger chain. You pretty much bring the mindgame of weaker and stronger chain back, so it's easier to manage which followup you should use. The Backdrop Chain on the other hand continues the guess which break they are mashing dynamic, with a little twist, which is the Sol Naciente (or Mexican Armbreaker). It's a 1+2 break chain that does nice damage on its own, and it's a less likely chain that people will break. Comparing it to the damage you can get from Burning Hammer plus Screwdriver (126 damage), Sol Naciente (103 damage) becomes a really good followup to do, considering that it is only a single chain with a single break. Use this, because most of the time, people change up their breaks after the backdrop when they notice.

Mastering Jaguar Step

Jaguar Step, not only the multithrow chain, is really dynamic. You can use this along with wavedash to actually get close to your opponent, and the multithrow is easy to setup because it's actually a option to a stance with other threats. But to be able to use it right, you need to know the things you can do with it. First, I would recommend to incorporate Jaguar Step on your game and know their tools and use them in battle, while treating the multithrow starters as just another option to numerous option you have.

Okizeme

Just like King's Wavedash, Jaguar Step is an excellent oki tool. The fact that you can hold it for up to 5 spins makes an interesting dynamic to it. First, you have a homing move in JGS df+4 and a frametrap/unblockable techtrap option in JGS 4, not to mention the JGS multithrow, making techrollers and siderollers covered (just be sure that you do this in a reactive way, meaning you wait for them to tech, because JGS doesn't realign itself). JGS 2 takes care of low getup kicks and backrollers (giving you a free crouchthrow attempt or a bound), and JGS 1 can also hit mid getup kicks. The only tricky thing about this is there is no canned option for people who stay on the ground, and expecially when you spin a couple of times, the options you have gets more scary, giving them an incentive to not get up until you do a canned attack and then getup kick punish you for this. Use this to your advantage. After a spin, you can stop and King will recover to standing really quick after the spin, which can break down any kind of plans your opponent wants to do. You can freely use regular King oki after this with much ease.

Movement

King's Jaguar Step is a good way to get up close to your opponent because of fear that you will do a follow up. Coupled with sidestepping, sidewalking, backdash cancels, King wavedash, Back Jaguar Step and SS 2+4 cancels, and you have a very dynamic way to move that should scare people. If you use them properly, you can make movement not only flashy and cool to watch, but also supremely effective. You can easily force whiffs and make you opponent feel they are always at a disadvantage on every situation, which they should be. Force that leverage to your opponent and know all your options.

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